Tuesday, July 3, 2012

HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY!

IMAGE CREDITS: CLOCKWISE BEGINNING TOP LEFT - MARTHA STEWART { HERE }, FOUND ON PINTEREST - WHEN I DUG FURTHER THE IMAGE CREDIT WAS FOR (HILARIOUSLY) J-WOWW'S BLOG { HERE } NOTE THE POST'S TITLE J , GOOGLE IMAGE, GORGEOUS INVITE FROM MICHELLE PURNER DESIGNS { FOUND HERE ON ETSY }, THE REMAINING ARE GOOGLE IMAGES.


This week marks America's 236th birthday.  Many of us will be lucky enough to celebrate with picnics, parades, & beautiful firework displays.  Now, I'm a gal that loves a good party but I wanted to throw some history in to today's post as well.  Think of it as your built in cocktail conversation or the knowledge that you can throw about effortlessly while you're flipping burgers!  I give you...

The History of The Stars And Stripes

The Stars and Stripes originated as a result of a resolution adopted by the Marine Committee of the Second Continental Congress at Philadelphia on June 14, 1777. The resolution read:
"Resolved, that the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field representing a new constellation. "

The resolution gave no instruction as to how many points the stars should have, nor how the stars should be arranged on the blue union. Consequently, some flags had stars scattered on the blue field without any specific design, some arranged the stars in rows, and some in a circle. The first Navy Stars and Stripes had the stars arranged in staggered formation in alternate rows of threes and twos on a blue field. Other Stars and Stripes flags had stars arranged in alternate rows of four, five and four. Some stars had six points while others had eight.

Strong evidence indicates that Francis Hopkinson of New Jersey, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, was responsible for the stars in the U.S. flag. At the time that the flag resolution was adopted, Hopkinson was the Chairman of the Continental Navy Board's Middle Department. Hopkinson also helped design other devices for the Government including the Great Seal of the United States. For his services, Hopkinson submitted a letter to the Continental Admiralty Board asking "whether a Quarter Cask of the public Wine will not be a proper & reasonable Reward for these Labours of Fancy and a suitable Encouragement to future Exertions of a like Nature." His request was turned down since the Congress regarded him as a public servant.

Personally, I think ol' Francis should have been given the vino.  My thanks to all that help keep this nation free with your service.  Happy Birthday, America! 

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